cipro treatment

A comiXologist recommends: IRON SQUAD #1: Red Commando ½

July 07, 2015

comixology:

A comiXologist recommends:
Iron Squad #1: Red Commando ½

by: Dane Cypel

When I was in school for my Masters, we would often speak about French comics –about how beautiful they were even though we could not read them. Myself, and my fellow candidates did not speak French, so in many instances the books were purchased simply for the pictures. It was the art that kept us interested and we did our best to discern a storyline and flesh out characters with what we could understand.

Delcourt’s English-translated releases have, thankfully, fixed this type of fill-in-the-blank storytelling that I have had to experience with French books. With this release, there is one particular book – Iron Squad #1, that has caught my eye.

I was not familiar, at all, with Iron Squad before reading it for this review. It was between this and Curse of the Wendigo, both having to do with a World War and some type of fantastical element. As much as I love tales of the Great War, the allure of Nazi super-weapons, Soviet armored infantry and 1st Lieutenant Tania Yakvolev, comrade pilot of the First Female Fighter Wing, had my attention.

Iron Squad #1 is an alternate history story, where Nazi scientists have cracked the secret to making large walking mechanized vehicles. There was one particular scene where a Nazi general meets with his Imperial Japanese counterpart to present the Empire with their own “Iron Squad,” or in the vernacular – “mekapanzers”. While this is in no way historical, there is a wonderful blend of Gundam-meets-Wolfenstein.

What is perhaps the most interesting point of this story is that there is no American protagonist, at all. It is a commonplace for World War stories to contain that obligatory American character, but this shift allows for a completely different perspective. Instead, the focus is on the Soviet side of this war. There is, of course, a French instructor who happens to have a mechanical arm, but he is only in a few panels. I was still able to relate to the characters and find interest in what they were doing – something which most French produced comics are able to achieve with solid storytelling and well-made art.

In the past, there was this inherent barrier that kept readers like me away from French books. I wanted to read them, to put words to the pictures, and now that wish has been answered. These books are beautiful, they are compelling, and they offer a unique approach often overlooked by us English-speakers to the comic medium.

[Read Iron Squad #1: Red Commando 1/2 on comiXology]

Dane Cypel is a digital editor at comiXology and freelance illustrator based in Manhattan.

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A comiXologist recommends: THE WITCHER Vol. 1

June 25, 2015

comixology:

A comiXologist recommends:
The Witcher Vol. 1

by: Dane Cypel

 

Dark Horse has come to comiXology and with it, their spectacular library. While some are excited for Hellboy, Buffy or Conan I was anxious to read The Witcher: Vol. 1 House of Glass.

The Witcher, known here in the states for its blockbuster video games, is a series of books, films, and comics featuring Geralt of Rivia. Geralt is not your typical hero, he hunts monsters, but in a different way.  His heroics are for hire – a town has a ghoul problem? Geralt will fix it, if they pay. If not, they can take care of it themselves.

It was this aspect of the character that really drew me to the novels and keeps me interested in the comic. He feels more human, he has flaws, he has vices and he is, sometimes, morally ambiguous. In a fantasy setting, Geralt is a breath of fresh air. The world of The Witcher is dark and grim. The inhabitants are continuously threatened by danger and death. These stresses are something the eponymous Witcher, Geralt, has to contend with on a daily basis and it shows.  He is not a holy crusader, or smarmy heart-of-gold swashbuckler: he’s something else.

For those who are familiar with the games, or the novels, The Witcher: House of Glass is a separate, closed story. Though it is similar to how the novels are written, Volume One is an excellent romp through this unique world. There are, of course, strange monsters, creative liars, succubi, and an excessive use of magic. I was slightly disappointed that the elven terrorist group known as The Squirrels, or the amusing bard Dandelion, did not make any appearances.  And while it is a shame that they didn’t appear, it does not detract from an overall interesting and amusing story.

For those who know The Witcher franchise, read this story. For those who are not familiar, read it.  If you like fantasy, read it. If you like good stories, read it and keep reading. The Witcher is a departure from the fantasy norm, the tropes of old do not apply and it creates something so different, so new, that you will crave more.

I read the entire book in thirty minutes, and then went back to read again. Now I’m anxious for volume two.

[Read The Witcher Vol. 1 on comiXology]

Dane Cypel is a digital editor at comiXology and freelance illustrator based in Manhattan.  

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A comiXologist recommends: GHOSTBUSTERS: GET REAL #1

comixology:

A comiXologist recommends:
Ghostbusters: Get Real #1

by: Dane Cypel

The Real Ghostbusters always seemed out of place- did they really expect me to believe that Egon was blonde, Slimer was good, and the containment unit was big and orange? Even as a child, I was distracted by these changes. Granted, I still watched every episode of the cartoon, and even now I sometimes return to watch a couple- Stay Puft is a great hero- but the cartoon and the films never really meshed.

And then I became aware of Ghostbusters: Get Real #1. Erik Burnham and Dan Schoening do the unthinkable and unite these two universes. Never mind that the first episode of the cartoon takes place immediately after defeating Gozer, or that Ghostbusters II’s only influence on the show was adding Louis Tully; Get Real is something else entirely.

Being the first issue of this arc, things are relatively slow. It begins within the world of the cartoon, which is captured in its mock-1980’s style animated appearance. At first it seemed a bit off, since it was unlike the style of the previous Ghostbusters books, but this homage works well. It went right for those feelings of nostalgia by looking like they were pulled right off the TV screen. Schoening, whose art I have been a fan of since he was brought on to property, goes above and beyond.

The story, at this point, is still getting off the ground. While this is only issue number one, seeing the cartoon and the film characters interact created an inescapably giddy feeling. The Egons were weary and erudite, the Winstons couldn’t care less and the Rays were best friends. All those years of watching the cartoon and the film, creating those imaginary scenarios of this exact situation, can finally be experienced.

One can only wait and see how awesome this series will be…

[Read Ghostbusters: Get Real #1 on comiXology]

Dane Cypel is a digital editor at comiXology and freelance illustrator based in Manhattan.  

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A comiXologist recommends: CHRONONAUTS #4

June 24, 2015

comixology:

A comiXologist recommends:
Chrononauts #4

by: Dane Cypel

When Chrononauts #4 was first presented to me, I had very little knowledge of the series or the story.  What I knew was that Mark Millar was the author and that Sean Murphy did a Back to the Future homage cover – that was it. Between these two things, there was nothing else really spectacular or eye catching. So I wrote it off and did not take any notice.

Then I worked on the book, and everything changed.

As I went through page by page, I began to construct a story around what was presented to me. Granted, I came in on issue #4, the final issue of this series so the events were not set-up. Yet I thought: how did the protagonists got into this situation, who was this antagonist they were facing, and why was time so distorted? Then I got to a specific sequence that wrangled me in: one of the protagonists, Corbin, rallies an army.

It begins with a montage through time- Norway, Sparta, France, Rome and China, where Corbin gathers soldiers and weapons to wage a war to set his friend, Danny, free.  Before an amazing double page spread, Murphy illustrates Corbin with an MG-42, flanked by Romans and Spartans, draped in traditional armor and wielding automatic weapons. Perhaps this is the geek in me, but this image is awesome.

After completing this issue, I want to know what caused these events. Why was Danny captured? HOW was he captured? How does time-travel work? And why is there such a goofy looking Tyrannosaurus Rex in the first couple pages? Luckily, this is a four issue series and issue #1 is not far away.  All of these questions can be answered.

If this hasn’t convinced you, just a little bit, to pick up these series and give it a read, I have one final thing to say: a portly Christopher Columbus falls off a boat.

I’m hooked and I want more.

[Check out Chrononauts on comiXology]

Dane Cypel is a digital editor at comiXology and freelance illustrator based in Manhattan.

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A comiXologist recommends: A-FORCE #1

June 23, 2015

comixology:

A comiXologist recommends:
A-Force #1

by: Dane Cypel

A-Force #1 is the first in an ongoing new Avengers-like series that departs from the Marvel team norm.  Authors Marguerite Bennett and G. Willow Wilson and artist Jorge Molina join forces to fashion a new team in a drastically altered Marvel Universe.  Existing within the new Secret Wars event, A-Force presents a reshaped world, which takes the familiar and attempts a different direction.

The issue picks up in the land of Arcadia. The Baron of this land, She-Hulk, has assembled a team of heroines to maintain order and protect her people. Without reading the surrounding Secret Wars titles, the world that these heroes live within is a world with a different set of rules. Dr. Doom is somehow overlord; Stephen Strange is a sheriff of some type, and there exists a group of planetary police known as the Thors.

On top of this, is the titular A-Force- an all female team of Marvel superheroes comprised of She-Hulk, Medusa, Dazzler, Nico Minoru and the briefly seen, Singularity. It is shown within that the membership of the team is much larger, with Sister Grimm, Ms. America, and Captain Marvel playing large roles.  Heroes, such as Sam Wilson and Namor make brief appearances as well, though it is the A-Force that commands the show.

Writing on the first issue of a series can be a difficult thing to do- it often takes time for a series to hit its stride- not only for the creative team but also for the characters within.  Story is king, and good story comes from good characters. I have to admit that I am not familiar with She-Hulk or Dazzler, but they are characters that can and will shine, especially within these pages and by this creative team. The framework they are placed in allows me to be intrigued as to how they will react: the perfect set-up for a story that can pull in anyone. A-Force #1 is an excellent beginning to a story that is highly recommended.

[Check out A-Force #1 on comiXology]

Dane Cypel is a digital editor at comiXology and freelance illustrator based in Manhattan.

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A comiXologist recommends: CONVERGENCE: CRIME SYNDICATE #1

June 22, 2015

comixology:

A comiXologist recommends:
Convergence: Crime Syndicate #1

by: Dane Cypel

 

The Crime Syndicate is more interesting than the Justice League.  This sentiment may draw some criticism, but ever since Morrison and Quitely’s JLA Earth 2, the stories of Ultraman, Owlman, Superwoman, Power Ring and Johnny Quick have always interested me more. Recently they returned in the Forever Evil event, and now they are back once again, but in a different, more Silver Age, form.

Convergence: Crime Syndicate #1 takes the classic team- the one from Justice League of America, Volume 1, Number 29, from 1964.  In more than one instance, this story is a throwback to the character’s original form, which shows more so in the art than the actual story.  It channels the Crime Syndicate seen in Crisis on Infinite Earths – even though they are technically not the same characters from JLA Earth 2, they are just as fun to read.

Convergence, like Marvel’s upcoming Secret Wars, takes characters from different universes and pits them against one and other in epic combat. In Crime Syndicate, the CSA face the Justice League and The Rogue Hunters. The League within is from DC One Million – future variants of the core JLA heroes. The Hunters, on the other hand, are a group similar to the Silver Age Flash’s Rogues Gallery- featuring a female Captain Boomerang, Captain Cold, The Top, Weather Wizard and Mirror Master. I never expected for these three groups to ever share a title, but Convergence allows these types of eccentric mash-ups to occur.

Convergence: Crime Syndicate #1 is a part of a larger whole and it shows. As it stands currently, more needs to be seen though it has my attention. I want to see how Owlman takes on Batman, or if Power Ring will outsmart Aquaman.  On top of that, the Crime Syndicate is an evil Justice League- how is that NOT interesting? Try this out, because, at the very least it will be entertaining.

[Check out Convergence: Crime Syndicate on comiXology]

Dane Cypel is a digital editor at comiXology and freelance illustrator based in Manhattan.  

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A comiXologist recommends: HOWARD THE DUCK #1

June 21, 2015

comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:
Dane Cypel recommends

Howard the Duck #1

Howard the Duck #1 released today with anticipation.  When most hear this title, they think of the 1986 Lucasfilm movie of the same name. Thanks to this film, Howard has had a difficult time getting back on his webbed feet. If it was not for the popularity of Guardians of the Galaxy and its end-credits scene, this wise cracking duck may have never returned to the comic page.

Chip Zdarsky (zdarsky​) , famous Image’s Sex Criminals, helms this book by bringing Howard into 2015 and making him a private detective. Being issue #1, the story is somewhat shallow: Howard, as a private investigator, takes a job to find a stolen necklace. While this “go-out-and-find” quest does seem mundane, Zdarsky sprinkles in cameos from several of Marvel’s heavy hitters. For example, Howard’s office is shared with Jennifer Walters, a.k.a. She-Hulk, with whom he annoys on a seemingly consistent basis. Spider-Man and Rocket Raccoon are there as well, but the banter between Jennifer and Howard is charming and fits with the characters.

Joe Quinones’ (joequinones)  art steals the show. He takes the titular character and adds life to this anthropomorphic waterfowl. The panels are simple, yet complex, filled with easter-eggs and detail, while not detracting from the overall flow. Even his design for Howard channels the traditional look while making him disgustingly cute.

I never thought I would be writing these words, but Howard the Duck #1 is excellent. I laughed, I cried, and I was thankful that this was not another 1986 film.

[Read Howard The Duck #1 on comiXology]

Dane Cypel is a digital editor at comiXology and freelance illustrator based in Manhattan.

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A comiXologist recommends: ARCHIE VS PREDATOR #1

June 20, 2015

comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:
Dane Cypel recommends

Archie vs. Predator #1

Archie Versus Predator #1. It reads similar to something like chicken and waffles- they put those two together? Archie and the gang against the Predator is ridiculous. It took Green Beret Arnold to take one down, so how could the Archie group do the same? Was Archie going to don the camouflage paint and outwit the mighty space-hunter?

Alex de Campi (alexdecampi), author of IDW’s Smoke, and Archie regular Fernando Ruiz (fernandoruizeverybody) unite to tell a tale that no one ever thought would be told.  The two bring a unique take on the Archie universe, both de Campi and Ruiz channeling that classic Archie vibe, while introducing a completely new and fresh element. This first issue features several pages of Predator-filled gore drawn in the wholesome Archie style, which was surprising and awesome. I have worked on many Archie titles during my time here and this book was simply refreshing.

When I say refreshing, it is not because of the gore; instead it is the publisher’s willingness to take chances. Unlike other mainstream publishers, who have a strict set of rules for their primary characters, Archie seems to have thrown all caution into the wind- and it works. Before Predator, Archie Comics introduced Afterlife With Archie, placing the Riverdale gang against a zombie epidemic. Again, an outlandish premise transformed into an amazing book, through both story and art. Even though Predator does not have an artist like Francesco Francavilla at the helm, Ruiz’s classic look gives everything a very tongue-in-cheek feel.

Archie Versus Predator exists to break the mold, create some laughs, and do the impossible. Most of the fun reading this book came from trying to predict who would live or die, and how they would get out of this mess. It is a funny, amusing ride that will make comics history.

Like chicken and waffles, two things that together seem disgusting but are in fact delicious, Archie Versus Predator has a similar synthesis- it is both amazing and absolutely delicious.

[Read Archie vs. Predator #1 on comiXology]

Dane Cypel is a digital editor at comiXology and freelance illustrator based in Manhattan.

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A comiXologist recommends: STAR WARS #1

June 19, 2015

comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:
Dane Cypel recommends Star Wars #1

Marvel’s Star Wars #1 is a new, fresh, and exciting take in a franchise where many stories have already been done.

Similar to other Star Wars books, this story takes place after Star Wars: A New Hope, with the Rebellion riding high from their victory against the Empire. We find our usual group of heroes: Luke, Leia, Han, Chewbacca, C-3PO and R2-D2 on a covert mission in an Imperial munitions factory. Things do not go as planned and a certain “Sith” complication is introduced- marking a turbulent start for a story that could easily be imagined as the beginning of another Episode.

The creative team of Jason Aaron and John Cassaday bring the reader something familiar, yet different than what is expected. There are no recycled environments like Tatooine or Hoth and Aaron has a solid grasp on the characters, recalling their iconic roles in the films. Cassaday’s excellent art contributes to the story by providing likenesses without making the people or environments stale or stiff.

Star Wars #1 is a step in the right direction. It recalls previous standout Star Wars comics like The Thrawn Trilogy while also providing a counterpoint to In The Shadow of Yavin, which takes place in the same timeframe after Episode 4.

Marvel is reinvigorating the Star Wars franchise. The old adage “Do or do not, there is no try,” applies here. Marvel is not trying; they are doing – and doing Star Wars well. Yoda would approve.

[Read Star Wars #1 on comiXology]

Dane Cypel is a digital editor at comiXology and freelance illustrator. This is his first review.

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How things have changed.

February 16, 2015

It has been over six months since my last update on here, and oh, how things have changed. For the better, mind you.

A full time job at ComiXology takes most of my attention now, but there are some upcoming comic-related things which I am excited about. One Nation is currently being re-inked and colored. I’ve also been trying to build up my social media presence so follow me on Twitter or Instagram (the links to all of my profiles are on the top-right). I still am lost with Tumblr, so I might just abandon it.

In the mean time, here are some sketches I did this past weekend at First CON-tact in Queens:

 

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New Amalgam – Humbled and Impressed

August 04, 2014

I was fortunate enough to have a friend color in a recent New Amalgam drawing I did for Speed Demon – Flash / Daredevil. I sent him the lineart and a couple hours later, he sent me this:

I am absolutely amazed how well it came out. The colors were done by Michael Wiggam. He’s a professional colorist and has worked for Dark Horse. Follow him on Twitter @michaelewiggam and Google his name to see all of his amazing work.

 

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Summer Quarter and the So-To-Be Master (Update)

July 15, 2014

Summer quarter is here. With it comes classes that do not have to do with drawing- shocking, I know. For me, it is a step outside of the norm. One, is Art Criticism. I have no problem here besides having to sit down, write up a couple paragraphs and then hope I was close to what the professor wanted. The other class is a bit more challenging, but also a bit more interesting- The Publishing Process. Here we learn how to approach agents and publishers by creating materials to effectively gain interest in your work. I needed something like this. And an 8 page proposal is not so bad, but it is outside of my realm, especially when we deal with nonfiction. Besides writing, I am wrapping up my thesis, both the written and visual components. I’ve also decided to do some drawing which I’ve titled, The New Amalgam. From left to right is Man of Steel (Superman/Colossus), THe Iron Bat (Batman/Iron Man), Lantern X (Green Lantern/Wolverine), Odinson (Captain Marvel/Thor).

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